Issue 16

Friday, April 18, 2014

Local News

Federation to host 92Y Live program featuring Simon Schama and “The Story of the Jews”

The Jewish Federation of Greater Binghamton will host the 92Y Live program “Simon Schama in Conversation with Jonathan Safron Foer: The Story of the Jews” on Wednesday, April 30, at 7:30 pm, at the Jewish Community Center, 500 Clubhouse Rd., Vestal. This will be a DVD showing of a program held at the 92nd Street Y in New York City. The cost to attend will be $8 for the general public or $5 for Federation members. The doors will open at 7 pm. Light refreshments will be served.

CJS to hold spring programs: Debra Schultz opens CJS spring series May 1

The College of Jewish Studies spring series with the theme of “Jews Making a Difference” will begin with two programs in early May. The lectures will be open to the entire community. General admission costs $8 per event, or $20 for all three programs. Senior admission costs $5 per event, or $12 for the series.

The first of lecture will be held on Thursday, May 1, at 7:30 pm, at the Jewish Community Center, 500 Clubhouse Rd., Vestal. The event will be open to the community. Social activist and historian Dr. Debra Schultz will speak on “Legacies of Jewish Women Going South for Justice.”

CJS to hold spring programs: Professor Thomas Doherty at CJS on May 8

For the second spring College of Jewish Studies event, Professor Thomas Doherty will speak on “Jews, Nazis and Hollywood Cinema, 1933-1939” on Thursday, May 8, at 7:30 pm, at the Jewish Community Center, 500 Clubhouse Rd., Vestal. The event will be open to the community. The lectures will be open to the entire community. General admission costs $8 per event, or $20 for all three programs. Senior admission costs $5 per event, or $12 for the series.

Yom Hashoah programs to be held at BU April 27-28

Hillel at Binghamton will host its annual Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day, memorial ceremony on Sunday, April 27, at 7 pm, on the Binghamton University campus in Lecture Hall 14.

Israel News

Israelis treating Syria’s wounded confront complex injuries, cultural gaps

SAFED, Israel (JTA) – When an Israeli army ambulance brought an injured Syrian man to Ziv Medical Center in this northern Israeli city two months ago, the doctors didn’t know where exactly he was from. They saw that his leg had been amputated, and based on his own fragmented account and the physical evidence, the doctors surmised he had been hit by a shell. But they didn’t know exactly how he had gotten there. And when he leaves the hospital later this month, they don’t know where he’s going.

National News

Florida: It’s not just for old Jews anymore

HOLLYWOOD, FL (JTA) – At the Urban Rustic Café in a strip mall in this city located between Miami to the south and the Palm Beach retirement communities to the north, the line for a table stretches out the door and into the parking lot. Inside the kosher establishment, the volume is loud. An elderly Orthodox man sitting near the window leans across a table to hear what his wife is saying. At the dessert counter, a gaggle of boys with tzitzit fringes hanging from their shirts have their noses pressed against the glass. Nearby, two stylishly dressed 30-something women chatter away in Spanish, one of them rocking a young baby. As the blond waitress trying to serve them bumps hips with a busboy, the two have a brief exchange in rapid-fire Hebrew.

Welcome to South Florida’s Jewish community, an amalgam of retirees, Latin American immigrants, Orthodox families, Holocaust survivors and plenty more.

Features

Jewish history, a different view

History can be approached from a variety of viewpoints. Even when looking at the same material, historians often disagree about which aspects to emphasize. This becomes clear in Simon Schama’s new work “The Story of the Jews: Finding the Words 1000 BC-1492” (Ecco/HarperCollins Publishers), which is the first work in a two-part history of the Jewish people. (The second volume, “The Story of the Jews: When Words Fail: 1492-Present” will be published in October.) While most historians emphasize how Jews were outsiders in every culture in which they lived, Schama, a professor of art history and history at Columbia University, focuses instead on how Jews immersed themselves in the cultural life of their surroundings. Although Schama does record the oppression and persecutions that occurred in almost every society, he also shows how the Jews influenced, and were influenced by, their environment.

Opinion

Hi, it’s Sima

PJ Library donation and Jewish Film Fest inquiry.

Pharaoh versus God, or due compensation

If it had appeared on April 1, I might have assumed it was an April Fools’ joke. However, the link took me to a reputable site – The Middle East Media Research Institute website, which is not known for its humor. However, at least part of the headline struck me as funny: “Egyptian Columnist: Egypt Should Sue Israel for the Ten Plagues, Turkey for the Ottoman Occupation, France for Napoleonic Invasion and Britain for Colonialism.” I’ll leave the defense of Turkey, France and Britain to those nations, since what really struck me as curious was the idea of suing Israel for the Ten Plagues.

Holiday

In music, tracing the 600-year odyssey of the Sarajevo Haggadah

BOSTON (JTA) – Growing up in Bosnia, Merima Kljuco was familiar with the Sarajevo Haggadah. The medieval, illuminated manuscript was considered a treasure of the Bosnian National Museum for more than a century. Its 600-year journey from Spain through Italy and then Sarajevo, and its survival through persecution and near destruction at the hands of Jewish enemies, heightened its wonderment.

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